The dressing gown

In the time since I studied an online version of The Alchemist’s Apron with India Flint, in which I was introduced to the use of a rusty-object-solution iron mordant in a way that I understood freshly… there has been some time where I still felt no interest in using it. I have created some very black items with it, and some not so great prints. And then, there have been times when I thought that perhaps, I could put some effort into coming to grips with it and build my judgement. This apron was a turning point for me, where I began to see I might be able to do exciting things with it. And, I love any approach to textile dyeing where the main components are found, free and non toxic–which is why I enjoy India Flint’s approaches so much. Over time I have done quite a few experiments, including some where I created my mordant on holiday from found local objects and any leftover parts of lemons we happened to have, and combined it with the leaves available where we were staying and some calico from the local op shop. Ah, the pre-pandemic age. Maybe not my best work… but the time scale was ambitious!

What often happens as I accumulate various bits and pieces of bundle dyed fabric is that over time, a thought about what they could become forms. At first, I thought a shirt would be perfect. I asked a sewing friend and I don’t think she liked the idea as much as I did–after all it would be a grey shirt. I reconsidered. More months passed, and one day I was at The Fabric Store trying to get fabric in a specific colour for a beloved niece, and there it was, hanging on the wall in the perfect colour of a beautiful linen: The Lucie Robe. The kind of sample garment that must sell a lot of patterns and fabric, I reckon. I thought about the 20 year old terry toweling dressing gown hanging at home (a gift from my beloved now well past its best), and how many times in the last year I’ve thought I should try to make a new one. I considered the glorious (and of course, expensive) linen and then thought… I might use my iron mordanted cottons instead.

I did have to do the epic jigsaw-cum-collage that is assembling a pdf pattern. But then it was done and I was off, cutting out where the shapes of the dyed fabric worked for a pattern piece; patchworking together enough fabric for larger pieces as needed. Bits of old sheet and cast off calico, fast becoming a garment.

Somehow even the not so glorious bits work, I think–and what if they don’t? This won’t be out on the streets.

I like the E Nicholii leaves from the tree I planted myself! I also like the generous, elegant pockets.

But for me the bit that pulls it all together is the rose-leaf collar. I’m a fan. When I saw it, I had to check whether this was a silly whim. I did all that thinking about whether I really need another pattern, and even more than that–whether I need more fabric. I don’t need more fabric! But I am very happy about having chosen this to make with the fabric I already had.

12 Comments

Filed under Eucalypts, Leaf prints, Natural dyeing, Neighbourhood pleasures, Sewing

12 responses to “The dressing gown

  1. Stunning result, your hard work and out-of-the-bo thinking has paid off.
    It looks truly wearable. Would the so dyed fabric fade when washed?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your robe looks stunning! What an excellent result and the collar absolutely makes it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Well, everyone else has already said stunning, so I’ll go with gorgeous! And yes, the collar is definitely a wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jenny M

    Oh my, this is such a beautiful creation….what a pleasure it must be to wear it each day, knowing you have created such an original design. Love it!
    I thought I must have missed this on your IG, but on checking I can see you haven’t posted it there.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. elizabeth

    your robe turned out beautifully as you said the rose leaf collar made it really stand out. wont matter if it fades a little as possibly more of the leaf shapes will then show up.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Sue Hetzel

    It’s beautiful and I also really like the collar. My interest in using iron is reignited after a disappointing result!

    Liked by 1 person

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