Plum Pine 2: Mordant and Modifiers

Having had success with a test dyebath, I made a point of returning to Botanic Park to collect more fruit on weekend, en route to celebrating World Wide Knit in Public Day.  I dyed some grey corriedale locks in my test bath and they went from grey to a dull brownish shade, so I opted for superwash + alum and silk as the most likely candidates for success. I mordanted sock yarn of antiquity (picked up at a garage sale) and prepared another dyebath.  I regard sock yarn as a no risk option.  If I knit socks for a friend, I can make an open offer to re-dye at any point they fade to an unacceptable shade (and I can ask how they’re faring under normal wear and washing).

IMAG1461

The dye bath looked fantastic.

IMG_0168

I ran two baths with this fruit, because the first one produced purple on my alum mordanted skeins of sock yarn (wool-nylon).  I pulled it out of the bath after dark and in artificial light it looked quite brown. So I dropped the skeins back in the bath for the night and put test samples into an iron bath and a vinegar bath. Next morning the sock yarn was purple! The exhaust dyebath was a lighter and browner shade of mauve.  I apologise for these photos but it’s winter here and sunlight is in short supply.

IMG_0183

My tiny skeins of silk thread came out various shades of rose pink through to magenta too… and I have embarked on an embroidery project, so that was exciting.  The shades on the right are both using vinegar in the dyebath.

IMG_0178

The modifiers were interesting: the wool+alum strand was noticeably more purple with vinegar and noticeably more brown/grey with iron, which is, I think, about what should be expected.  So… a promising beginning to experiments with a new dye plant–but with no sense yet of how washfast or lightfast it might be.

IMAG1499

7 Comments

Filed under Dye Plants, Natural dyeing

7 responses to “Plum Pine 2: Mordant and Modifiers

  1. I know nothing about dyeing, but I find your experiments fascinating. Really enjoy reading about them.

    Like

  2. Very nice! The colours are beautiful. What a great experiment!

    Like

    • It’s been fun! I am interested by the differences in experimenting on my own with no anticipated audience, and experimenting and sharing through the blog. I sure love following others’ experiences.

      Like

  3. This is absolutely amazing and makes me wish i had time to dye my own yarn.
    I want to add that someone wonderful nominated me, so in turn i am spreading the love and I have nominated you for the WordPress Family Blog Award! Thanks for your pearls of wisdom 🙂

    Like

  4. Pingback: Plum Pine 5: Lightfastness | Local & Bespoke

Please feel free to join the conversation...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s