Tag Archives: Suffolk

Hand spun, hand knit socks

Remember this hand spun sock yarn?

2016-02-28 18.31.27

It had a long journey toward becoming a pair of socks.  Here we are early on, on the train…

2016-04-14 13.32.08

On my way to a meeting at work.  Five minutes early, enjoying the sunshine and shrubs… knitting down the heel.

2016-04-18 08.53.02

Visiting a friend in hospital (and past the heel flap on sock 1)…

2016-04-19 09.26.21

Here we are on our way to Newcastle to blockade a coal port–second sock started.  I got a lot of knitting done during train travel and nonviolence training (for an entire day–some climate change activists don’t muck about!) and there was another knitter in the training, too!

2016-05-07 06.33.33

Then I noticed late in the life of sock 2 that sock 1 and sock 2 were a bit different.  I made some adjustments.  Finally, I went over to my friend’s house for a try on. Turns out that the stretchy factor in knitting sorts out a multitude of small spinning and knitting crimes. It’s common ground between us that if he doesn’t care, I don’t either.  Usually he goes further than not caring and is pretty pleased about the whole woollen sock thing. Fantastic attitude.

IMAG1639

Here he is showing customary forbearance as a sock model.  Note hand knit sock on other foot.  Come to think of it, note hand spun, hand knit jumper in use years after being dyed with eucalypt. This is the attitude to hand knits that gets you another pair of socks in my circle of beloveds!

IMAG1661

 

 

22 Comments

Filed under Knitting, Neighbourhood pleasures

Walnut, weld and purple fountain grass

I went out to help with the local organic food co-op recently and came home with walnuts from the local food forest produce swap, with the nuts soon ready for eating and the hulls ready for dyeing:

2016-04-02 13.14.09

In the bucket, ready for their three week soak/fermentation:

2016-04-02 13.16.50

Post soaking and ready for the heat:

2016-04-16 10.00.10

With the application of heat, the dye bath grew darker still.  So in went my remaining suffolk fleece. It was with deep relief that I assessed the (acceptable though not delectable) smell of the dye bath.  It was a walnut dye bath that almost had me excommunicated from my Guild for cooking it up in the dye room when the Little Glory Gallery was open.  Ahem!

2016-04-16 10.33.49

Here is weld growing in the vegie patch:

2016-04-16 10.02.36

One of my plants wilted and fell over for no obvious reason, so I cut it out and set it to dry. I wondered if something has nibbled on its roots from below ground. Some days later I went out and found that the rest of the plant had died.  This time it is obvious that the main root has been chewed on or rotted away.  Curious.  I followed Jenny Dean’s instructions (more or less…) and due to lack of time, left the dye bath to sit for some days.

2016-04-16 10.05.53

Mum saved me her purple fountain grass–a whole wheelbarrow load.  I saw a post on Ravelry where a lovely green came from this plant just about when she was planning to cut hers back.  This was exciting!  For me, however–it gave only a fawn colour.  Sadly!

2016-04-16 10.41.11

Here is the walnut dye on the left and the fountain grass on the right.  It is a little more yellow-brown in life, but nothing exciting.  It went into the walnut exhaust.

2016-04-21 13.27.54

I now have two shades of brown Suffolk and some weld-yellow crossbred fleece ready to join a future colour knitting project.  May the rinsing begin!

2016-04-22 13.16.13

5 Comments

Filed under Dye Plants, Natural dyeing, Neighbourhood pleasures

Let the sock yarn spinning begin!

Classically, a hand spun sock yarn is made with a combed, rather than carded, preparation of fibres. I started out with my kilogram of Suffolk fleece, and divided it up.  Some has been dyed with legacy unnatural dyes and some with plant dyes.  I started in on combing some wool dyed in shades of blue and green.  I dyed some tussah silk along with the wool (the silk did not take the dye well at all), and have local kid mohair that is plain natural white, and some that has been dyed with dyers’ chamomile, and some I bought dyed by the seller in shades of blue and purple.  I am blending in the silk and mohair for strength and durability.

2016-02-10 18.55.57

I have ‘English’ combs.  I am not sure what makes them English (they were made here in Australia)–I am sure there is a historical reason for the name.  But they are vicious looking things.  When I take them to Guild, there are always onlookers commenting on the fiendish tines.  Unfortunately, I am yet to find a Guildie who can offer me advice on better use.  This seems to be a minority preoccupation at my Guild, or perhaps I’ve just been unlucky.  So.  Step 1 is ‘lashing on’, loading the stationary comb with fibres.

2016-02-20 11.12.05

Step 2 involves combing the fibres off that comb and onto the other.  Done!

2016-02-20 11.14.01

Now, transferring the fibres back to the stationary comb.  It could go on… but this is the extent of my patience at this point.

2016-02-20 11.16.41

Then, pulling off ‘top’ through a diz.  I do love spinning terminology!  This produces a preparation in which the fibres are in alignment, ready to be spun into a dense, hard wearing yarn.

2016-02-20 11.34.38

Some of my top shows that I tried to blend fibres of different lengths.  This is a vice to be avoided in combing.  Combing does a great job of removing short fibres (and burrs and grass seeds…) but if the fibres are of differing lengths, the top will have (in my case) all mohair–the longest fibre–at one end and wool predominating in the middle, with the shortest silk fibres predominating at the other end.  I cut some of the kid mohair locks in half (another spinning crime!) to resolve this issue in some cases, and in others, spun top from both ends to blend the fibres as I spun them up.

2016-02-10 19.58.27

And here is the finished skein.  It is abut 5 ply (fingering), a little thicker than many sock yarns–but after my last effort, where I produced something thinner than sock yarn and have been too overcome to knit it up–I think that is OK.  I have chain plied it, which is not strictly speaking recommended for durability–but this seems to be a much debated point and I chose colour happiness over potentially reduced durability on this occasion. So–I am not quite ready for the knitting to begin, but I am getting closer.  One sock down to the toe on the current pair in progress…

2016-02-28 18.31.27

6 Comments

Filed under Fibre preparation, Sewing

Quebracho and Dyer’s Chamomile

2016-01-31 20.00.02

I am on a project to create my own sock yarns this year using natural fibres.  As part of the dyeing–because I like wildly coloured socks!  I decide to dye some mohair and suffolk fleece.  I have some dyes that were gifted to–or abandoned in–the dye room at the Guild.  This time I chose Quebracho–which was not mentioned in any of my dye books but I assumed would require an alum mordant.  I organised that, and found to my surprise that the preparation of quebracho I had completely dissolved.  It’s a tree-based dye so I had rather imagined it was finely ground wood.  Wrong.  Interesting!  Then, a second surprise.  I thought it would be red, but actually, quebracho comes in a range of colours and I had quebracho yellow.

2016-01-31 18.34.32

Which was a shame, really, as my second dye pot was dyer’s chamomile.  Never mind.  Yellow fibres can be readily blended and overdyed and needless to say I have some fibre dyed with eucalyptus destined to join this blend which might blend beautifully…..

2016-01-31 20.05.13

The first dye bath from each came out rather splendidly and intensely yellow (quebracho on the right), and I was reminded that dyers’ chamomile always smells edible.  Also, that it might be the right time of year to harvest this plant again (I took secateurs to the dead flowers of a patch growing in a city park last year).  I love the smell of eucalyptus, but edible isn’t the thought that comes to mind!

2016-02-17 15.13.19

I ran exhaust baths with some of Viola’s (crossbred) fleece.  It had been in a cold alum mordant bucket for some months.  Perfect!  Ready to go at just the right moment! Another win for slow dyeing processes… and one step closer to an all natural sock yarn.

2016-02-17 15.13.23

12 Comments

Filed under Dye Plants, Natural dyeing

Suffolk for socks

2015-09-05 12.22.18

Speaking of spinning my own sock yarn, let me introduce my wool.  While I was at the Show last year, I checked in with the Suffolks.  They were the featured breed for 2015.

2015-09-05 16.35.50

As it happens, I bought a kilo of suffolk at the Guild when there was an opportunity a while ago.  I came home keen to wash fleece somehow.  I try not to resist that inclination no matter how daft, because it doesn’t happen often.  This time it was pretty daft–I finished after dark and could only hope the fibre would be clean in the morning.

2015-09-05 17.17.24

I don’t think the fleece was skirted… so there was some serious loss, not to mention burrs, wattle seed (that is a new one!) and feathers (that was new too).

Meanwhile, I had a helper.  She has since left us for a new life in Tasmania, but she was so interested in knitting!  A shame really.  I cut out a pattern and she chewed on the paper.  Ooops.  And here she is sorting out an apron string!

2015-09-05 15.41.26

You just can’t be too careful with an apron string when it is hanging provocatively off the side of a chair.

2015-09-05 15.41.25

4 Comments

Filed under Fibre preparation

More socks!

More socks off the needles after a long period of being unfinished…

IMAG1421

Long ago I had the opportunity to buy part of a raw Suffolk fleece that had been discarded by another spinner.  I had been steadily reading my way through the Guild’s library, so I recognised this as a breed that was eminently suitable for sock spinning.  At the time, I only knit socks.  They were the whole reason I had learned to knit, and then to spin.

As it turned out, the Suffolk was a very short staple and none too clean fleece.  Never mind.  I gleefully acquired it and proceeded to use my beginning dyeing skills on it.  Four pairs of socks came of it.  One, pink dyed with hibiscus flowers, went to my Mum.  Another was dyed in eucalyptus leaves as fleece and spun up afterward.  I can’t remember who I gave that pair to.  I think they might have gone to tree lovers in the Blue Mountains.  I made my father a glorious pair that were purple and blue, blended rather beautifully after dyeing (and at that stage, their loveliness was an accident!)

These were made from Suffolk blended with tencel, which may have been ill advised–time and wear will tell.  The colour could have been better and the blend is uneven, but a three ply handspun yarn is a work of dedication and there was enough even for a pair of large feet, so I knit these.  They are going to a dear friend who lives nearby, who does indeed have large feet.  Last night he spoke about a pair I made him years back that he is still wearing hiking.  This pair may not last as long but I hope they will keep his toes warm at the very least!

Leave a comment

Filed under Knitting, Spinning