Epic jeans mending

So my gardening jeans are many years old and have long since passed out of being suitable for  wear in polite company.  But my jeans do tend to wear through in places that I don’t really want to draw attention to. They have reached the point where I’m at risk of the fabric suddenly and dramatically parting company. But these are comfortable and fit for purpose otherwise. And won’t be easier to mend if they do rip dramatically.

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I kept thinking it might be time to let them go, but one night I decided against that.  What to do?  I made a paper pattern of the section I decided to try patching, so I could make the patch go all the way onto the seams. Then I cut patch pieces from the leg of another pair of jeans.

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I now hold my grandmother’s pinking shears, so I decided to pink the edges of the patching.

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I am a slacker so I pinned them on and then tacked by machine.  I know that hand stitched patching can be a lovely thing, but I have tried it in this part of a pair of jeans and the stitching wore off on the outside!  And, the less obtrusive the better.  This is not a situation for the visible mending programme, though I am in favour of it, in general.

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I did some early stitching to hold the patch in place and then stitched around the perimeter. This was followed by a lot of straight stitching up and back again in the most worn sections.

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And–the finished item actually looks slightly better than the original did, with lots of machine stitching in grey–the colour that was the best match to the fabric at this stage in its decay. These jeans will never return to their prime and don’t need to look glorious.  That’s probably part of why I was prepared to do an epic mend: I love a low stakes project.

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And now, we see how that wears! They will be back in the garden on the weekend for sure.

2 Comments

Filed under Sewing

2 responses to “Epic jeans mending

  1. Looks good! Patching the seat is always an awkward fix, just because of the angles involved.

    Have you ever tried taking a lighter-weight piece of denim (like, the back of a chambray shirt) and patching the entire seat instead of just one side of the rear seam? That way your patch can borrow the integrity of the fabric on the other cheek too and you don’t have to worry about stitching up to/into the rear seam to anchor it. (And when you wear the other side out, the patch is already there!)

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    • Thanks thriftomancer (love your handle there)! I patched the whole seat in two different sections here and decided that might be the way to prevent pulling across the seat. I have patched with thinner fabrics in other contexts, but I need all the help I can get in this zone, and gardening isn’t gentle on my clothes either! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Like

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