In they go…

This time it was a weekend morning jaunt out into the neighbourhood with a dozen ruby saltbush.

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I have had my eye on this spot where mulch has been laid but nothing has been planted.

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Once I got my trowel into it I could see why–some parts are concrete, some are all bluemetal and gravel.  But in others, there was some very clay soil.  Not ideal.  But I am not planting anywhere ideal really.  I wished them luck.

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Hopefully they will make it in spite of the soil and this massive fence with one of the tallest olive trees I have ever seen peeping over it.

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I’ve pricked out the bladder saltbush.

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To join their larger relations, soon to go out into the suburban wilderness.

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And I planted seeds of New Holland daisy and more ruby saltbush and bladder saltbush.  Then, I worked over the E Scoparia fruits I have been gathering.

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I hadn’t been feeling optimistic about gathering seed, but actually once I started rolling them around, seed started to emerge.

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I think there will be plenty to make good on my sharing promises and try planting some myself!

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6 Comments

Filed under Natural dyeing

6 responses to “In they go…

  1. I did a little guerrilla gardening in the UK – well tried to 😦 The local council had very tidily and horribly filled a huge garden space with mulch, so I planted lots of nasturtium seeds…..and waited and waited and waited for a result. Just a few sad sickly looking plants grew – never any flowers. So disappointing. I think the mulch was too piney and just too strong for even nasturtiums. So I do hope your ruby saltbush fare better – it’s not a plant I know in the UK – hopefully it will love mulch 🙂

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    • I am so sorry to hear of this disappointing outcome! Pine mulch would be acidic I think, so might have been part of the problem your seeds faced. Here, mulch is partly about keeping weeds suppressed (and I think that is a good idea, and far better than the alternative Council adopts, which is poison). However, when I see mulch, I think that seedlings have a better chance of thriving, because it is so hot and dry here that without mulch to try and keep soil cooler and retain a little moisture, even hardy native plants like the ones I’m planting often won’t make it. I have had some failures, but as I work at observing what is doing well, I have more and more successes and some of the first plants I guerilla planted are now full size bushes. As your mulch breaks down, perhaps you could have success too? Best wishes for your next attempt.

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  2. Thank You my little stash of treasure arrived yesterday… keep you posted.
    It sounds like you are having better luck with woad than me mine still has not germinated (lucky for me I know where to get the seed)

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    • My woad is looking good! I think it is notorious for needing to be fresh to germinate though and this is the third source of seed I have tried. Not a single JI seedling so far though 😦 Good luck with your sprouting all round!

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  3. you’re a wonder, me dear. my Pa upset the local council greatly back when we lived in Surrey Hills, Vic in the 1960s by planting natives all along our street [and replacing them when they were removed]. He also cheekily planted trees all along our road here in the wilds of Mount Pleasant, a lovely daily reminder of who he once was

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    • Thanks! It warms my heart that other folk think this is a worthwhile thing to do, since many don’t. I am a creature often seen crawling about the kerbs and wastelands of the suburb by people who cross the street to make sure it isn’t contagious. Your Pa–sounds like he has left many a fabulous legacy, trees very much included. I can only imagine how much he must have loved your tree-, leaf- and nature-honouring work.

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