This week in guerilla gardening

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This morning, I went out with some saltbush I’ve grown from seed and some other plants a friend has grown and given me for guerilla gardening.  She comes from a coastal area and is growing plants well adapted (and mostly endemic) to her local sandy soils.  They are thriving in sandy areas of our suburb.  So the saltbush went in under a large river red gum in our neighbourhood, the better to protect the root zone of this giant tree.  Then I trundled around to a spot in the neighbourhood where the pattern of what will grow is very different to the rest of the patches I’m working, partly because the new beds created here in the wake of major infrastructure works are very sandy.

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In went several of these native hibiscus, an olearia, a kangaroo apple and a rhagodia (seaberry saltbush).  Out came weeds, alive and dead, and feral tree seedlings.

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The tiny E Scoparias that my friends and I planted months ago are thriving here but still small.  The council has planted a random eucalypt and a Manchurian Pear since we put them in, and they were much bigger–but they left the E Scoparias to live, bless them.  Let’s see how it goes.

Where previously nothing grew, now there are a lot of boobiallas (myoporum), some good sized olearias, a few saltbush and a couple of feijoas as well as the trees.  One saltbush is loving it here and has set fruit.

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As I finished watering the new plants in and set off to weed invasive grass out of a very successful patch nearby, one of the cyclists whizzing past called out ‘good work!’  It was a good way to start the day: kneeling in the earth and planting things that might help it heal.

6 Comments

Filed under Eucalypts, Neighbourhood pleasures

6 responses to “This week in guerilla gardening

  1. Susan

    GOOD WORK is right 🙂 Looked up Kangaroo apple, nice plant but I guess it can be invasive…maybe that’s a good thing for you!

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    • Thanks, Susan. Invasiveness is an important consideration. But, I think it will really struggle to be invasive in this context. Someone has planted one along the tram line nearby and it has lived. But not spread.

      Like

  2. purplejulian

    wonderful work 🙂

    Like

  3. Enjoying all your blog, from plantings to dyeings. Great work!!
    Jazzy Jack

    Like

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